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March 17, 2016

Career Services Office Notes:
Spring break is the perfect time to kick your job search into high gear!Schedule a meeting with Shelly to go over your job application materials in advance of one of the career conferences in the first weeks in April.
GradUCON (University-wide): Friday, April 8th
MAPSS/CIR Student-Alumni Career Conference: Saturday, April 16th
*See RSVP info below

Career Services

FEATURED
PhD Application Workshop | If you are interested in applying to doctoral programs next fall or in the future, please join Chad Cyrenne at thismandatory PhD workshop. We will cover the mechanics of getting in as well as the existential question of whether you should go. | Please read the Updated PhD Application Handout HERE
Tuesday, March 29th from 5-7pm | SSR 122MAPSS/CIR Student-Alumni Career Conference | Save the date for the annual MAPSS and CIR student-alumni career conference. This conference brings alumni from both MA programs who are eager to share their unique career paths and trajectories with current students. This is an excellent opportunity to network with alumni from both MAPSS and CIR. | RSVP Here for a limited number of tickets!
Saturday, April 16th, all day | Saieh Hall
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Master’s Program Write-In: March Term 2016 | UChicagoGRAD | Having trouble keeping up with regular writing? Worried about long papers? Regardless of whether you have a thesis, seminar paper, or other project to work on, Spring Break can be a good moment to catch up, even while you’re taking a deep breath. At the same time, it can feel difficult to get motivated and isolating to work—especially when it seems like no one is on campus, and there is no class to attend. Join MA students from across programs for three hours of intensive writing each day. UChicagoGRAD will provide coffee and breakfast on Day One, and lunch every day from 12-1. | Put down a deposit of $50: if you attend every day throughout the week, you get your money back, no questions asked. | More Info + Register
Monday, March 21st-Friday, March 25th | Classics 110

Women in Global Policy | PLEN: The Public Leadership Education Network | PLEN is a national organization that prepares women for leadership in the public policy arena through seminars in Washington, DC. We have an upcoming seminar in which you will have the opportunity to dive into international policy issues, expand you network, and develop your professional skills. Students will hear from leaders advocating for humanitarian issues, citizens’ rights, international security, and international development in an increasingly interconnected world. | Need-based scholarships are available for students. | More Info + Register
Seminar Dates: May 16-20
Application Due: April 22nd (Travel scholarship application due April 4th)

Courses

Vienna Summer School in Urban Studies | University of Vienna | Public spaces are places where the complexities of urban development manifest themselves. Public space is multi-use; from political representation and economic use, to activism and protest, with various actors claiming a stake in its development, including the authorities, private companies, civil society, and citizens. The new complexity in the network of actors with a claim on public space calls for an interdisciplinary approach as well as a diversity of methods to empirically study the city. With the Vienna Summer School in Urban Studies, we aim to address the challenge of analyzing the fragmented needs and practices of a heterogeneous urban society, including those groups affected by exclusion from city life and public space. | Featuring professors Suzanne Hall (LSE), Joseph Heathcott (The New School New York), and Elke Krasny (Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna)| More Info + Apply
*Dates: July 1st-July 8th in Vienna
*Application deadline: April 1st

Thought Provoking

Orit Halpern: The “Smart” Mandate: Infrastructure, Responsive Environments, and “Preemptive Hope” | UChicago English Dept | Today, growing concerns with climate change, energy scarcity, security, and economic collapse have turned the focus of urban planners, investors, and governments towards ‘infrastructure’ as a site of value production and potential salvation from a world consistently defined by catastrophes and ‘crisis.’ From discussions about ‘disaster capitalism’ to the embrace of a world after humans, the idea that some environmental, economic, or security catastrophe has arrived, or will arrive, is almost unquestioned. In response, there has emerged a new paradigm of high technology infrastructure development obsessed with ‘smart,’ ‘ubiquitous,’ ‘sustainable,’ or ‘resilient’ infrastructures. This talk will interrogate the different forms of futurity and life that are currently emerging from this complex contemporary relationship between technology and design and by engaging in a genealogy of ‘smartness.’ How do contemporary practices in computing, responsive environments, and ‘resilient’ planning shape the design of large-scale infrastructures and our imaginaries of the future of life?  | More Info + Register
TONIGHT!: Thursday, March 17th @ 4:30-6:30pm | Rosenwald 405

Joseph Masco and Travor Paglen: Interrogating the Security State | CIS | The CIS 50th Anniversary speaker series continues with a conversation between Trevor Paglen, artist and geographer, and Joseph Masco, anthropologist at UChicago on global surveillance and the security state. | More Info + Register
Wednesday, March 30th @ 5:30pm | SSR 122

Lobbying Against Cancer: Representative Marcus Evans on Cancer Advocacy | International House | South-side native State Representative Marcus Evans speaks on Cancer Advocacy and ways to be active on the political side of the cancer fight. Rep. Evans will be introduced by Dr Kathy Godd, Director of Strategic Partnerships at the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center, who will open the event by talking about her experience lobbying in DC for research funding. | More Info + Register
Wednesday, March 30th from 6-7:30pm
International House, Assembly Hall

The South Side with Natalie Moore and Rick Perlstein | Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture | While mayors Richard M Daley and Rahm Emanuel have touted Chicago as a “world-class city,” it remains one of the most segregated cities in America. And while it would be easy to think of a city with a billion-dollar park, Michelin-rated restaurants, waterfront views, world-class shopping, and a thriving theater scene as a model for other metropolitan areas, underneath the shiny façade lurks the horrible reality of deeply-rooted and destructive racial segregation. Throughout The South Side, Moore shows that race—not class—determines the policies that perpetuate the city’s injustices. She takes readers inside a system that keeps a segment of the city’s population from having a chance at the American Dream. | More Info + Register
Thursday, March 31st from 6-7:30pm
International House, Assembly Hall
 

 

Workshops

Latin America and the Caribbean | “‘There in the Sky is Santa Maria’: The Sound of Gender in Afro-Brazilian Sacred Rituals” by Genevieve Dempsey
Thursday, March 17th from 4:30-6pm | Kelly 114

German Philosophy | “Consciousness of Life and Living Self-Consciousness: On Hegel’s Transformative Picture of the Human Mind,” by Thomas Khurana (Frankfurt)
Friday, March 18th from 1:30-4:20pm | Wieboldt 408

On Campus Jobs

Research Assistant – Survey Interviewer | Survey Lab | The University of Chicago Survey Lab seeks interviewers for work on a number of ongoing survey research projects. Ideal candidates are interested in the social sciences and able to manage positive, professional interactions with a wide cross-section of the general public. We offer 9 – 15 hours of work per week. Employment opportunities continue through June 2016, with potential transition to upcoming projects after that time. | More Info
*Apply HERE

Communications Assistant/Content Coordinator | Division of the Social Sciences Office of the Dean | The SSD Dean’s Office is seeking a Communications Assistant/Content Coordinator to help build and manage content for the divisional web site and social media. This position requires excellent professional communication skills and will involve working with administrators in the eight departments and many centers and institutes to collect information to be highlighted via the division’s various distribution channels. Other duties include: image research/formatting for web and social media, writing copy, assisting with the logistics of branding projects, event planning, and web project management. | Must be proficient in PhotoShop, MS Word/Pages, Powerpoint/Keynote, and social media platforms. | Opportunity to work through the Summer, Fall
Submit resume and cover letter to Renee Basick, rlbasick@uchicago.edu

Fellowships

Summer Internship | The Foreign Policy Initiative | The Foreign Policy Initiative Summer Internship seeks graduate students with an interest in the fields of—but not limited to—political science, security studies, democracy and human rights, and public policy. FPI interns focus on policy-oriented research and have few administrative responsibilities. Many interns have the opportunity to author FPI publications. All interns attend policy discussions at leading think tanks in the DC area and interact closely with FPI’s in-house expert. Though the FPI internship program is unpaid, it seeks to impart practical skills and provide networking opportunities for students determined to pursue a career in public policy. | More Info and Apply
*Apply ASAP

Jobs

Senior Strategy Associate (Chicago) | ORC International | At ORC International, we are leaders in the art of business intelligence. We help clients explore, navigate, and integrate insights to uncover what truly engages people around the world. With a focus on improving business performance and growth, we combine quality data, smart synthesis, and a best in class digital platform to deliver transformative business insights across our clients’ customers, employees, markets, and products. We’re seeking a professional who has proven skills to communicate the right message at the right time, in the right way. The Senior Strategy Associate will support the SVP of our Strategy practice to drive revenue and sales. He or she will partner with the SVP in business development efforts and marketing initiatives, as well as supporting the execution of internal training; process managements and improvement; and knowledge management efforts. | More Info + Apply
*MAPSS alum hiring, very interested in hiring a MAPSS or CIR student (ask Rachel or Shelly for her information if interested in learning more)

March 10, 2016

Career Services Office Notes:
Career Mentor in Residence: Alum in Consulting | Alexander Verschoor-Kirss (CIR 2014), Senior Consultant at Booz Allen Hamilton, will speak about his experiences in policy research, consulting, and working in DC. This is a great opportunity for students who are interested in consulting, government policy research, and finding success in Washington, DC.
Tomorrow!: Friday, March 11th from 4:30-6:30pm | Saieh 247

Career Services

FEATURED
PhD Application Workshop | If you are interested in applying to doctoral programs next fall or in the future, please join Chad Cyrenne at thismandatory PhD workshop. We will cover the mechanics of getting in as well as the existential question of whether you should go. | Please read the Updated PhD Application Handout HERE
Tuesday, March 29th from 5-7pm | SSR 122Save the Date!: MAPSS/CIR Student-Alumni Career Conference | Save the date for the annual MAPSS and CIR student-alumni career conference. This conference brings alumni from both MA programs who are eager to share their unique career paths and trajectories with current students. This is an excellent opportunity to network with alumni from both MAPSS and CIR. | Stay tuned for an RSVP form and more information
Saturday, April 16th, all day | Saieh Hall
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GRADUCon | Join UChicagoGRAD for the seventh annual career conference for graduate students and postdocs, covering trajectories in academia, industry, nonprofits, and government. GRADUCon is a daylong program of panel discussions, workshops, and opportunities to interview and network with diverse alumni. Panel discussions include: Careers in Finance, Nonprofits, UX Research, Your First Year as a Faculty Member, Teaching in a Liberal Arts College, Careers in Communications, Library Careers, Tech Industry Forum, Consulting Introduction, Data Science Careers, LinkedIn for Graduate Students and Postdocs, The Healthcare Industry, Industry Research Careers for Scientists, and Smarter Cities: How Graduate-Level Training is valued. The event includes breakfast, lunch, and a reception.| More Info and Register
Saturday, April 8th, all day | Multiple locations on 53rd St

Conferences

Political Economy in the Age of Enlightenment and Revolution: Interdisciplinary Approaches | Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society | The aim of this one-day conference is to take stock of recent developments in the study of Enlightenment social and political thought; of growth, reform, and crisis within European imperial states; and of the development of new publics and institutions that demanded political participation and reform in the final decades leading up to the French Revolution. With the growing important of political economy within received narratives about Enlightenment and Revolution among the major European states and their empires, the study of political economy itself has become more ambitious and interdisciplinary in its methods.
Friday, March 18th, from 9am-4:30pm
Neubauer Collegium, 5701 S Woodlawn

Thought Provoking

FEATURED
Geographies of Knowledge: Area Studies and Globalization Studies Reconsidered, Panel Discussion | Center for International Studies | Please join us for an exciting conversation and anniversary celebration of CIS that features Dain Borges (History), Julie Chu (Anthropology), Susan Gal (Anthropology), and Lisa Wedeen (Political Science), who will be joined by special guest Arjun Appadurai (Media, Culture & Communication, NYU). Area studies emerged in the post-war US academy and reflected a national agenda that privileged strategic regional expertise within a bipolar world. Globalization studies came of age in the 1990s. Responding to geopolitical shifts coinciding with the end of the Cold War, globalization studies forged a new approach to analyze and interpret social, political, and economic dynamics within and across world regions. In each case, both area studies and globalization studies articulated historically-specific geographical imaginaries—of the globe, its constituent parts, and their relations—that have indelibly shaped social scientific research and public understanding alike. | More Info + RSVP
Tuesday, April 5th @ 5pm | Ida Noyes Hall, Cloister Club
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A Conversation with Iranian Human Rights Lawyer and Nobel Peace Prize Winner Shirin Ebadi | IOP | The first Muslim woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize, Shirin Ebadi will visit the IOP to discuss her career and her new book, Until We Are Free: My Fight for Human Rights in Iran. In the book, Ebadi writes of the years of intimidation she endured under the Islamic Republic—wiretapping her phones, bugging her law firm, sending spies to follow her, harassing her family and friends, and arresting her sister. The Iranian government would end up taking everything from Ebadi, but it could not take her spirit, and she continues her human rights activism in exile. | Book sales and signing to follow | More Info + Register
Monday, March 14th from 2:45-3:45pm | IOP, 5707 S Woodlawn

Climate Change: Why Journalism Failed with Alan Rusbridger | Stigler Center for the Study of the Economy and the State | Climate change is perhaps the biggest story of our generation. If the planet warms up in line with the majority of informed predictions the likely consequences for the human race will be immense. Yet how often do you read a story about climate change on the front page of your regular newspaper? How often does the subject feature in television bulletins? Why is it that journalism has failed to rise to one of the most pressing issues of our time? Alan Rusbridger, after editing the Guardian for 20 years, decided to end his editorship by running a five month campaign to try and get the issue into greater public consciousness. In doing so, he broke all the conventional truth about journalism taught in J Schools. But arguably, he succeeded in bringing about change. | More Info + RSVP
Tuesday, March 15th from 5-7:30pm
Harper Center Room 104, 5807 S Woodlawn Ave

Matthew Desmond – “Evicted” | The Urban Network & Family Action Network | Matthew Desmond discusses Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City. In this brilliant, heartbreaking book, Matthew Desmond (Harvard University) takes us into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to tell the story of eight families on the edge. Even in the most desolate areas of American cities, evictions used to be rare. But today, most poor renting families are spending more than half of their income on housing, and eviction has become ordinary, especially for single mothers. Based on years of fieldwork and painstakingly gathered data, this masterful book transforms our understanding of extreme poverty and economic exploitation while providing fresh ideas for solving a devastating, uniquely America problem.  | More Info + Register
Tuesday, March 14th @ 6pm | Seminary Co-op Bookstore

Orit Halpern: The “Smart” Mandate: Infrastructure, Responsive Environments, and “Preemptive Hope” | UChicago English Dept | Today, growing concerns with climate change, energy scarcity, security, and economic collapse have turned the focus of urban planners, investors, and governments towards ‘infrastructure’ as a site of value production and potential salvation from a world consistently defined by catastrophes and ‘crisis.’ From discussions about ‘disaster capitalism’ to the embrace of a world after humans, the idea that some environmental, economic, or security catastrophe has arrived, or will arrive, is almost unquestioned. In response, there has emerged a new paradigm of high technology infrastructure development obsessed with ‘smart,’ ‘ubiquitous,’ ‘sustainable,’ or ‘resilient’ infrastructures. This talk will interrogate the different forms of futurity and life that are currently emerging from this complex contemporary relationship between technology and design and by engaging in a genealogy of ‘smartness.’ How do contemporary practices in computing, responsive environments, and ‘resilient’ planning shape the design of large-scale infrastructures and our imaginaries of the future of life?  | More Info + Register
Thursday, March 17th @ 4:30-6:30pm | Rosenwald 405

 

 

Workshops

FEATURED
Social Theory | “Police Failure and Global Racisms: A View from Jamaica,” by Eilat Maoz
TONIGHT: Thursday, March 10th @ 6pm | Wilder House

Global Christianities | “Iconic Economies of Sao Paulo: Space, Image, Circulation,” by Maria Jose de Abreu
Friday, March 11th from 12-1:30pm | Swift 106

Visual and Material Perspectives on East Asia | “Water, Ice, Lapis Lazuli: The Making of a Buddhist Paradise through the Sixteen Meditations in Tang China,” by Anne Feng
Friday, March 11th from 4:30-6:30pm | CWAC 156

Wittgenstein | “Davidson and Wittgenstein on Meaning and Understanding,” by Barry Stroud (University of California-Berkeley)
Friday, March 11th from 1:30-4:20pm | Wieboldt 408

American Politics | “Bang for your Buck, Not a Free Lunch: Consumer Fairness and American Attitudes to Taxation,” by Ethan Porter
Monday, March 14th from 12-1:20pm | Pick 319

Political Theory | “Fragile Universals: The Making of Racial Hierarchy in the League of Nations,” by Adom Getachew
Monday, March 14th from 12-1:20pm | Pick 506

Animal Studies | “Charles Darwin’s Post-Mortem Natural History: (De)Composing the Earth Through the Action of Worms,” by Sarah Bezan (University of Alberta)
Wednesday, March 16th from 4:30-6pm | Rosenwald 405

Latin America and the Caribbean | “‘There in the Sky is Santa Maria’: The Sound of Gender in Afro-Brazilian Sacred Rituals” by Genevieve Dempsey
Thursday, March 17th from 4:30-6pm | Kelly 114

Fellowships

Research Assistant – Survey Interviewer | Survey Lab | The University of Chicago Survey Lab seeks interviewers for work on a number of ongoing survey research projects. Ideal candidates are interested in the social sciences and able to manage positive, professional interactions with a wide cross-section of the general public. We offer 9 – 15 hours of work per week. Employment opportunities continue through June 2016, with potential transition to upcoming projects after that time. | More Info
*Apply HERE

Fellowships

FLIA Fellowship with the Boys and Girls Club of Central Iowa | Future Leaders in Action is dedicated to cultivating leadership and supporting youth through our fellowship program. Fellows work on-site at a partner community organization to implement and evaluate a recurring program that supports children and youth in one of the following areas: advancing skills for success; promoting public health; promoting social welfare and serving the disadvantaged; or protecting the environment. | More Info + Apply
*Deadline: Friday, March 25th

Jobs

Veteran’s Program Specialist (Lansing, MI) | US Department of Labor | Based in the state office, this position executes the following duties: provides the development, organization, and promotional efforts and actions to improve and expand job training, search, placement, employment counseling opportunities, and reemployment benefits for veterans and other eligible persons; monitors, provides a wide measure of guidance, reviews and carries out administrative requirements for grants for Local Veterans’ Employment Representative (LVER), the Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) with the DVET for the state; conducts a wide variety of reemployment rights investigations and reviews to determine whether complaint is covered; maintains liaison and promotes cooperative relationships with officials of Federal, State and local agencies to promote veterans’ programs; and prepares annual work plan for planning yearly travel expenditures and other activities to be performed throughout the year. | More Info + Apply
*Application open until Tuesday, March 22nd

Grassroots Organizer | Impact | Make your impact on our environment, our democracy, and our future. If you are interested in joining a team of passionate people to make an impact on issues like global warming, clean water, big money’s influence over our democracy, and other issues that matter to our future, consider a job with Impact. Impact is a nonprofit that runs action campaigns. We work in states where we can win positive change for our environment, our democracy, and our future. | Impact is now accepting applications to join our team in August 2016. | Apply Now
*Priority application deadline is Sunday, March 13th

March 3, 2016

Career Services Office Notes:
Social Sciences Division Town Hall for Graduate Students | Do you have questions or concerns you want to raise with the Social Science Division administration? Do you want to ear from our Divisional Deans about their perspective on graduate education here at UChicago? Are you curious about topics on the minds of other Social Science students? Come meet your Divisional Deans as they answer graduate student questions and promote greater communication across the Social Sciences Division. | Dinner will be served | More Info +RSVP
Monday, March 7th from 5-6pm | SSR 122

Career Services

Tax Workshop | UChicagoGRAD | Do you have questions about how to report your taxes? Jennifer Waters, Director of Financial Operations at Campus and Student Life, will provide a helpful presentation on taxes as they pertain to stipends and financial aid for graduate students. While individual tax advice is not available, this workshop will give you the basics of how taxes apply to graduate student funding. | More Info +RSVP
Friday, March 4th from 12-1pm | Harper 140CivX Applications Open | CivX is a student-driven social impact program. It combines social science research and design thinking to help organizations and communities develop new approaches to mission-critical problems. Started in 2013, SSD graduate student teams have worked with nonprofits and communities in Chicago and New Delhi, India. This year we’re working with a whole town in downstate Illinois. Projects are conducted as “research and design sprints” in which teams conduct research, prototype tangible solutions, and run a validation study in 5-10 days. CivX projects provide students with hands-on experience serving communities, translating research findings into solutions, collaborating across disciplines, and with project management. It’s an intense experience with a tangible outcome. And because projects are short-term, students don’t have to worry that participation will distract from their summer research obligations. CivX is meant to complement and enhance students’ research training and give them compelling stories to share in future interviews (both academic and non-academic) about what their training can do. | Application
*Application Due: March 9th at 12pm

Center for the Economics of Human Development Recruitment Fair | Advance your research career at the Center for the Economics of Human Development by learning who they are, what they do, and the various opportunities available for graduate students. | More Info +RSVP
Wednesday, March 9th @ 7pm | Saieh 203

Conferences

Politics of Difference: Migration, Nation, Postsocialist Left and Right | SOYUZ Symposium | The Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary forum for exchanging work based on field research in postsocialist countries. The SOYUZ theme this year gains immediacy and poignancy from the migration and refugee crisis in Europe in Autumn 2015.  While some leaders repudiate migrants from points east by calling for a “Christian” Europe, others welcome them as a Christian gesture.  Such differences are not new to postsocialism.  Religion, out-migration, borders, nationality have been flash points repeatedly. The conference will examine these and other forms of difference-making within and across contemporary postsocialist contexts. Economic globalization and the integration of eastern Europe into the European Union have provided the context for postsocialist transformation.  Yet, such projects of integration have encouraged new articulations of difference and reframed old ones: Minorities, diasporas, east-west relations, techno-environmental differences and border-disputes. Neo-nationalist groups rail against in-migrants and minorities at the same time as nation-branding projects posit national distinctiveness as a lure for foreign investment and tourism.  Narratives of “culture wars” vilifying differences of sexual orientation and life-style have erupted, opposing conservative religious and political groups to the purportedly cosmopolitan values of “the West.”  New xenophobias and homophobias compete with discourses of tolerance, each staking claims to what constitutes belonging and civilization.  Deep discontent over waves of neoliberalization, austerity, corruption and kleptocracies have reconfigured economic polarization as political difference, with Left and Right both taking on new valences within an increasingly agitated political spectrum. | More Info +RSVP
Friday-Saturday, March 10th-11th | Franke Institute for the Humanities

Spring Courses

Microsoft – Business & Society Shaped by the Cloud (BUS 37701-01) | Spring Quarter, Thursday and Friday, 8:30am-11:30am | The transition to the Cloud represents a massive technology shift. While its merits were heavily debated only a few years ago, today it is broadly accepted and both vendors and enterprise customers are rushing to adopt it. The nature of this transformation however is still poorly understood. Most new technologies are initially viewed as a replacement of the old, caused by a failure of imagination. The big question in front of us is how Cloud is going to change the way society works. How is the easy availability of massive amounts of compute and storage, of powerful predictive analytics and ease of mobility of data & insights going to change society? How will it change the way companies do business? Which human activities will benefit most from augmentation of artificial intelligence? What new industries will emerge? Which ones will be eliminated? What jobs will disappear and what new types of jobs will be created? While precise forecasts are almost always wrong, companies in the technology sector will need a point of view on which to base its strategy. Microsoft Corporate Strategy is asking a Spring Management Lab to consider these questions.  The selected team will report their findings to Kurt DelBene (MBA, 1990, Chicago Booth), Executive VP, Corporate Strategy & Planning and Rolf Harms, General Manager, Strategy & Acquisitions at Microsoft.  Ian Foster, Director, Computation Institute, Argonne National Laboratory & Professor, Computer Science, University of Chicago will support the project as a technical coach. | More Info
*To apply, send resume and cover letter addressed to Professor Jonathan Frenzen, Director of Labs, to susan.hubbard@chicagobooth.edu | Applicants are encouraged to add their thoughts about how they would approach the problem in their cover letter
*Early deadline: Friday, March 4th @ noon
*Final deadline: Sunday, March 6th @ midnight

Thought Provoking

Whither the Weather? Climate and History in Sino-Central Asian Relations | CEERES | Nicola di Cosmo, Luce Foundation Professor in East Asian Studies the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University, will present on climatology and politics in Asia. His most recent work explores the use of proxy data from climatology and other palaeosciences in the study of the history of China and Central Asia, with special reference to Eurasian nomads, the Mongol empire, and the Qing dynasty. | More Info + Register
Friday, March 4th from 4:30-6:30pm | Saieh 146

The Pursuit of Happiness: Transgender Equality in 2016 | IOP | Please join the IOP for a conversation with transgender rights activist Mara Keisling. As Executive Director of National Center for Transgender Equality, she is a strong voice on Capitol Hill and across the country for transgender equality. As an advocate, Keisling works to raise public awareness of transgender issues, and to establish legal and policy priorities within the transgender movement. Keisling will address challenges facing the transgender community ranging from misunderstanding and discrimination, to violence. In this event, we ask how political activism can affect social and legislative change, and what hurdles the transgender movement is facing. | More Info + Register
Monday, March 7th from 6-7:15pm | IOP, 5707 S Woodlawn

Najita Distinguished Lecture in Japanese Studies | International House | The Tetsuo Najita Distinguished Lecture series was launched in 2007 by the Committee on Japanese Studies at the Center for East Asian Studies to honor the legacy of Tetsuo Najita, Robert S Ingersoll Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of History and of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, and his contribution to the university over his long career. This year’s lecture will be given by Yoko Tawada. A one-day symposium titled “Where Literature Begins: The Practice and Poetics of Multilingual Address” will accompany the lecture. The panelists for the symposium are J Keith Vincent (Boston University), Brett de Bary (Cornell), Bettina Brandt (Penn State), Yasemin Yildiz (UIC), and Andrew Long (Northwestern). | More Info + Register
Monday, March 7th @ 4:30pm (keynote) | International House, Coulter Lounge

The Battle Over Free Speech on College Campuses | International House + IOP | In 2015, The Atlantic, Salon, The New York Times, and The Washington Post all published pieces about the complex balance between free speech and political correctness on college campuses. This was a pivotal year for this discussion across the country and at the University of Chicago—leaving Americans wondering: how did we get here? Is the First Amendment under attack? Where do you draw the line, if any, between First Amendment rights and offensive speech? Are speech codes and safe spaces needed on campuses? And what responsibility do colleges have to create a climate that encourages an open and respectful exchange over ideas? | More Info + Register
Wednesday, March 9th from 6-7:15pm | International House, Assembly Hall

 

 

Workshops

FEATURED
Gender and Sexuality Studies | The Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop is seeking submissions for the Spring quarter on the theme of “Gender, Sexuality, and the Transnational.” While seminal works of feminist and queer theory have elaborated the gendered and sexed production of the nation and its imagined communities, scholars have also long been preoccupied with the transnational dimensions of gender discourse—we might think, for instance, of the enduring importance of critical work on the relationship of first- and third-world feminisms. The breadth and diversity of such work has only grown in recent years, with the intensified interest in transnationalism and its associated concepts and figures (globality, planetary, etc.). We welcome papers on the transnational poetics and politics of gender and sexuality, whether historical or contemporary. Topics might include: social movements, global justice and global inequality, migration and diaspora, border violence, transnational cultural forms.
Submit abstracts (250-500) words by Tuesday, March 15th toGSSWorkshop@gmail.com

US History | “The Location of Charisma: The Chicago Freedom Movement and Black Religious Space,” by Evelyn Atkinson
TODAY!: Thursday, March 3rd from 4:30-5:45pm | SSR224

PIPES | “Rethinking Military Alliance Treaties,” by Paul Poast
TODAY!: Thursday, March 3rd from 4:30-6:30pm | Pick 506

Central Europe | “The Symbolic Image of Central Europe: Jewish Experiences in Postwar Czechoslovak and Polish Culture, 1945-1968,” by Ilana Miller
TODAY!: Thursday, March 3rd @ 6pm | SSR224

Latin American History | “Theaters and the Creation of an Urban Public in Sao Paulo, Brazil,” by Aiala Levy
TODAY!: Thursday, March 3rd from 4:30-6pm | Rosenwald 405

Early Modern | “Monsters of Early Modern Colonialism: The East India Companies and Slave Plantations as Primitive Accumulation of Hyper-Capitalism,” by Ralph Austen
Monday, March 7th from 5-6:30pm | Pick 319

Political Theory | “Analogues of Revolution: Public Reason and Kant’s ‘As If’ Republicanism,” by Will Levine
Monday, March 7th from 12-1:20pm | Pick 506

Global Christianities | “Authority, Action, Ethics: Ethiopia,” by Andrew DeCort
Monday, March 7th from 12-1:15pm | Swift 208

Middle East History and Theory | “Can the Provinces Speak? A Roundtable Discussion on Writing Ottoman Provincial History,” by Tolga Cora, Annie Greene, Varak Ketsmaniam, and Basil Salem
Tuesday, March 8th @ 5pm | Pick 222

Urban | “The New Rehabilitationism? Examining Mental Health Courts in an Age of Neoliberal Penal Governance,” by Julian Thompson
Tuesday, March 8th from 12-1:20pm | SS105

Money, Markets, and Governance | “Governing Sustainable Transactions: Empowered Participatory Governance in a Large Agro-Food Value Chain,” by Tal Yifat
Tuesday, March 8th from 4:30-6pm | SSR 401

East Asia Studies | “Chinese Online Nationalism Revisited: Toward a Multi-Faceted Understanding of Nationalism,” by Yinxiam Zhang
Tuesday, March 8th from 4:30-6pm | Pick Lounge

African Studies | “Face-to-Face Marketing and the Two-Faced Brand: Localization and the Instabilities of Mediation in South African Advertising,” by Mary Robertson
Tuesday, March 8th @ 5:30pm | Wilder House

Gender and Sexuality Studies | “The Impact of Working Alone: The Experiences of Women in the Trucking Industry,” by Jessica Zulema Borja
Tuesday, March 8th from 4:30-6pm | 5733 S University Ave

Late Antiquity and Byzantium | “Material Culture: Late Antique or Early Medieval?” by Deborah Deliyannis (Indiana University)
Wednesday, March 9th @ 4:30pm | CWAC 152

Human Rights | “Rebooting the Cold War: The New Cold War with Russia and the Foreign Policy of Popular Culture,” by Penny von Eschen (Cornell)
Wednesday, March 9th from 4:30-6pm | SSR224

Animal Studies | “Charles Darwin’s Post-Modern Natural History: (De)Composing the Earth Through the Action of Worms,” by Sarah Bezan (University of Alberta)
Wednesday, March 9th @ 4:30pm | Rosenwald 405

Comparative Behavioral Biology | “Integrating Cognitive and Behavioral Research to Evaluate the Welfare of Primates in Sanctuaries and Zoos,” by Katherine A Cronin (Lincoln Park Zoo)
Wednesday, March 9th @ 12pm | BPSB 122

18th/19th Century Atlantic Cultures | “Grammars of Approach: Landscape, Print, and Narrative,” by Cynthia Wall
Thursday, March 10th from 4:30-6pm | Rosenwald 405

Semiotics | “TBA,” Miyako Inoue (Stanford)
Thursday, March 10th from 4:30-6pm | Haskell 101

Fellowships

REMINDER: IOP Internships (funded) | Multiple opportunities | More than forty exciting internships have been opened to MAPSS and CIR students. These internships are exciting opportunities to work in government, policy, politics, advocacy, and related fields. Stipends are provided to offset living expenses. Currently posted opportunities include at the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, US Department of the Interior, Vera Institute of Justice, Illinois Republican Party, and Reboot Illinois, with many more being added over the next few weeks. To apply, log into GRAD Gargoyleand click on Jobs. Search for Institute of Politics to see the current listings, and check back regularly for updates. | Any questions can be directed to Alyssa Weel (alyssa2@uchicago.edu)

Democracy Studies Fellowship Program | The Charles and Kathleen Manatt Democracy Studies Fellowship Program at the International Foundation for Electoral Systems brings outstanding graduate students to the Washington, DC area each year to conduct research in democracy development, election administration, and civic participation in the political process. Previous fellows have found the Manatt Fellowship to be an excellent boost to their careers in international development or research. Manatt Fellows have direct access to IFES experts in democracy-building and research and benefit from Washington DC’s wide network of democracy professionals, institutions, and resources. |More Info and Apply
*Application due Tuesday, March 15th

Global Internship Competition | City Internships | City Internships gives students the opportunity to amplify the value of their time at university. Internships have become increasingly important in bridging the gap between college and professional life. Our programs offer meaningful work experience and career-focused seminars and social events that spark ambition and flair in participants that will stay with them throughout their working lives. Student ambassadors help raise City Internships brand awareness and serve as the brand voice at their university. The Global Internship is designed to expand participants’ horizons and get them job ready in the following areas: banking and financial services; marketing, advertising, and PR;entrepreneurship; and design. | More Info + Apply
*Application due March 14th

Jobs

Program Analyst (San Francisco, CA) | Department of Labor | This position will assist in monitoring the Regional Federal safety compliance program by providing advice to the supervisor concerning Regional and National Office policies, the Field Operations Manual, and new directives and instructions dealing with enforcement of OSHA safety programs; conducts a variety of studies pertaining to the implementation, performance, and impact of Regional programs using technical, evaluative, and analytical techniques; receives safety, health, and whistleblower complaints; interviews complainant to establish jurisdiction and appropriate statuses involved; assists in investigations on complaints received from employees of business enterprises who report safety and health hazards, or allege job discrimination under one of the whistleblower statues; among many other responsibilities, assists in the review and preparation of comments on National Office compliance activities. |More Info + Apply
*Application due Tuesday, March 8th